Clinical Trials

 
 
 

Participate in a Clinical Trial

 

If you would like more information regarding clinical trials and/or which trials are currently being performed in our department, please contact our Clinical Trials Unit +61 3 9936 8277.


Video: The E.J. Whitten Foundation supports Epworth’s trials

 

The E.J Whitten Foundation has contributed to make the Pinpoint trial and the Prosper trial a reality for hundreds of prostate cancer patients, watch below:

 


Clinical Trial: PINPOINT

 

A clinical trial to investigate using a new imaging test to find where prostate cancer has recurred after surgery, and; using implanted radiofrequency emitting beacons to precisely locate and treat recurrences in the prostate bed.

 

Technical name: Phase II trial harnessing PSMA-PET and Calypso® real-time tracking to precisely locate and treat recurrent prostate cancer.

 

Principal Investigator: Dr Patrick Bowden (Radiation Oncologist)

 

Basic Information:

 

The PINPOINT study is testing a new way of identifying and treating prostate cancer that has recurred in the same place where the prostate was removed from during surgery (prostate bed). There are two parts to the study and not all patients will the requirements to participate in both of them.

 

The first part of the research involves a new way of identifying prostate cancer cells using a Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) Scan sensitive to the biological marker, Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA).

 

The second part of the research involves a new way of treating prostate cancer using very small beacons called Calypso® beacons, which are inserted into the prostate bed and emit a radiofrequency (RF) signal. These allow us to locate and track the prostate bed during radiotherapy.

 

The aim of this trial is to utilise PSMA PET scans to more accurately identify men who have no metastatic disease and only offer those men salvage radiation therapy, using the Varian Calypso® advanced target localisation technique. This will also allow for early identification of men who have metastatic disease, and thus ensure that they receive the appropriate treatment rather than salvage radiotherapy, which would be futile.


This trial is registered on the Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry. You can read more about it here.

 

Status: Currently recruiting


Clinical Trial: PROSPER-82


A Prospective Phase II Trial Investigating SpaceOAR™ Hydrogel in Patients with Prostate Cancer Receiving Dose Escalated Radiotherapy to 82Gy Basic Information

 

Principal Investigator: Dr Andrew See (Radiation Oncologist)

 

Basic Information:

 

Men undergoing radiation therapy to treat prostate cancer, are at risk of healthy tissue in the bladder and rectum being affected by the radiation that is delivered to the prostate. The PROSPER-82 trial aims to recruit men with prostate cancer, who have not had surgery to remove their prostate, and who have been referred for standard radiation therapy for this condition. Several weeks prior to radiotherapy, a temporary gel (SpaceOAR®) is injected into the space between the prostate and the rectum. The gel pushes the prostate away from the rectum and bladder. This allows the dose of radiation given to the prostate to be maximised, while minimising any damage to the bladder and rectum.

 

Status: Currently recruiting


 

Clinical Trial: TRANSFORM

Radiotherapy Mediated Eradication of Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer (<5 sites) following prior local treatment: A Prospective Phase II trial.
 

Principal Investigator: Dr Patrick Bowden (Radiation Oncologist)

 

Basic Information:

 

The TRANSFORM trial is aiming to enrol 200 men who have developed secondary prostate cancer, where the cancer had spread to a small number of areas (less than five). Patients on the trial are given a very high dose of radiotherapy (stereotactic radiotherapy), with the aim of preventing the cancer from spreading any further while simultaneously avoiding the use of hormone therapy and chemotherapy. The treatment is given 5 days a week over a total of two weeks. We estimate that this study will contribute further to the research into controlling the progression of metastatic prostate cancer while minimising the side effects.

 

Status: Closed to recruitment​


 

Clinical Trial: SHRINC

 

Stereotactic Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Including Neurological and Cognitive Assessment
 

Technical name: A Phase II Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Hypofractionated Radiation for Multiple (≥3) cerebral metastases including Neurological and Cognitive assessment

 

Principal Investigator: Dr Mike Dally (Radiation Oncologist)

Basic Information:


The research project is testing a new treatment for patients where cancer has spread to three or more spots in the brain. The new treatment is called Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy. This is highly focussed radiation given in one or a few (5-6) treatments. Robotic targeting is used to avoid important parts of the normal brain.

 

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether improved radiation planning technology that conforms to the shape and size of a cancer, can be used to treat multiple sites of cancer within the brain, and at the same time protect and preserve brain (memory and cognitive) function.

 

We estimate that this study will contribute further to the research into using radiotherapy to control cancers that have spread to the brain, while minimising the effects on brain function.


This trial is registered on the Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry. You can read more about it here.

 
Status: Currently recruiting
 
 

Clinical Trial: LASERS

 

Radiation treatment prior to surgery for local spine metastasis

 

Technical name: A Phase II Study for the Treatment of Localised Spine Metastasis: Assessing the Safety and Efficacy of Image Guided Radiosurgery prior to Surgical Stabilisation.

Principal Investigator: Dr Neda Haghighi (Radiation Oncologist)

 

Basic Information:


The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) given prior to surgery is technically feasible and clinically safe for the treatment of patients with localised spine metastases. Who is it for? You may be eligible to join this study if you are aged 18 to 85 years, have any non-haematological cancer type, and have been diagnosed with spinal metastases in the past 4 weeks for which spinal surgery has been prescribed. Study details: SBRT is a type of radiation therapy in which a few, very high, doses of radiation are very accurately delivered to a small, well-defined target area. It is normally delivered after surgery in the treatment of spinal metastases however this approach has a number of drawbacks. In this study, all participants will receive radiation treatment at least 7 days before surgery, with doses ranging between 16 – 24 Gy over 1-2 days. Patients will be assessed for signs of toxicity and pain at 1 then 3 monthly intervals for 2 years following the SBRT treatment. It is hoped that the findings of this trial will aid understanding of whether it is technically possible, and safe, to deliver SBRT prior to surgery for spinal metastases, in place of the current standard care in which SBRT is delivered following surgery.

 

This trial is registered on the Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry. You can read more about it here.

 

Status: Currently recruiting