With a whole lot of crying and feeding going on, all newborn babies will experience wind.

Wind isn’t so much of an issue for mature digestive systems, as it can be easily pushed out, but a newborn’s digestive system doesn’t handle it quite so well. Burping your bub can help avoid sore, windy tummies.

Burping can be done in a number of different ways, however Qi Rhythm pre and post-natal massage therapist, Melanie Myres, suggests the easiest way with a newborn is to hold baby against your chest, with its head over your shoulder and one arm supporting the bottom. Once the baby is outstretched, gently stroke or pat the back with your other hand.

It’s not unusual for your baby to vomit up some milk during burping, so it’s a good idea to pop a cloth over your shoulder to avoid (yet another) ruined top! For the first six months, keep bub in an upright position for 10-15 minutes after feeding to help keep the milk from coming back up.

If this position doesn’t work for your bub, there are other positions you can try that might be more effective.

Try sitting baby upright in your lap, supporting the chest and head with one hand and stroking the back with the other. The gentle pressure of your hand on the chest can help to relieve the wind. Make sure you’re supporting bub’s head by the chin not the throat.

You could also lay baby across your lap on their belly, supporting their head and ensuring it’s higher than the chest, giving a gentle pat on the back with the other hand.

Some babies might be windier than others and require burping during feeding when switching breasts and babies with colic might also be gassier from swallowing more air when crying.

If you’d like to learn more about techniques for burping your bub, you can chat to your midwife, one of our lactation consultants or book in for an infant massage with Qi Rhythm.

15 August 2018

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